This resource offers tips for choosing culturally responsive books for children and how to check for stereotyping and bias.  There is a worksheet included that can be used when evaluating a children’s book and links to other helpful resources.  Check out the Head Start National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness for more information and resources.

Selecting Culturally Appropriate Books Resource

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Read books to infants while you are holding them on your lap or be sure he/she can see the book. Any book with pictures will do, but board books work well for infants who often want to grab the pages or put the book in their mouth. Read for as long as the infant seems interested and don’t worry if you don’t make it all the way through the book. Allow the infant to touch and hold the book and read the same books many times. As infants gain more motor control allow them to turn the pages.

For a list of books by age click here.

Goal: To begin supporting infant’s language development and book knowledge.

A fun activity with old books or magazines is to create story cards that show a sequence. Cut out 3-6 pictures that show actions as part of a sequence of events. Glue the cut out pictures to construction paper or cards. You could laminate them or cover them with clear contact paper for extra sturdiness. Children can work individually or in small groups to place the cards into order. These sets of cards can be made available for children to choose to work on independently. If children need help you can use sequencing language (first, next, last, etc.) to support children’s vocabulary growth.

Goal:  This activity supports children’s language skills and cognitive development in terms of memory, sequencing patterns, and problem solving.

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