Due to the outbreak of COVID-19, I had to re-think my sick policy and revise the parent handbook to reflect the new changes instituted by the state Health Department and recommendations from the CDC.

A typical sick policy within a child care setting consists of children not returning until 24 hours after the last symptom (fever, diarrhea, vomiting, flu, etc.). A doctor’s note is not always required upon returning, just as long as the child has returned after the 24-hour wait. This policy has its flaws. Oftentimes, the children are still not well after the 24-hour time frame. Illnesses such as a stomach virus, strep throat, or flu seem to pass through a child care setting like wildfire, being passed between not only the children but staff as well, causing unforeseen shut-downs due to the lack of adequate staff to child ratios.

COVID-19 has changed the way we handle sick policies and has also changed the way parents feel about keeping an ill child out of the facility, for the better.

Our new sick policy was added as addendums to the old policy and reflects a longer exclusion period of 48 hours after the last symptom of fever and/or illness. A doctor’s note is also required upon the return of any child who was out with an illness, stating that the child is in good health and can return to the facility. These measures alone have substantially cut back on illnesses being spread throughout the program. I have seen fewer sick children and staff for this time of year as compared to previous years. Because of this reason, I have decided to make these policies indefinite.

Have you had changes in your program policies due to COVID-19? Connect with us to share the changes and impact on your program.

Daily health screenings are a vital tool which help identify potential health risks and may reduce the transmission of infectious diseases in child care programs. Having a health check chart for each child can help providers keep accurate records and look for patterns.

To safely operate during COVID-19, symptoms of COVID have to be included in the health screening tool. Provider Laverne Head, owner of Our Leaders of Tomorrow, shared her updated screening chart.

Our Leaders of Tomorrow Daily Health & Temperature Checklist

 

A first-hand account of the challenges of staying open during the pandemic written  by a friend of Town Square Patricia Twymon

It is 6:54 a.m. on Tuesday morning and my cell phone is ringing. My client, an essential worker, tells me that he is on his way to drop off his daughter Hailey at my home child care. I hang up and take a steadying breath. Like every morning since the pandemic began, I wonder to myself if I am doing the right thing by keeping my doors open to the children of essential workers. I am putting my family at great risk. Both my husband and I have underlying conditions, and his 83-year-old mom lives with us. Could I live with myself if one of them contracted COVID-19 because of my decision to stay open? At the same time, could I live with myself if I shut my door on parents and children in need?

The doorbell rings a short time later and I make my way to my front door. We have all gotten the routine down, now. I open the door and move aside to let Hailey in. Her father stands a distance away from the door; he knows not to approach the threshold. 

Hailey and I do not hug as we did before the pandemic, but I give her a smile and say good morning. I visually scan her body and listen for a cough as she removes her coat. I do not have access to a thermometer to check her temperature, so I look closely for sweat on her brow. When she is ready, I lead Hailey to the bathroom so that she can wash her hands. As I watch her lather, I feel a tinge of pride. She has learned what areas she needs to reach and how long she has to rub her hands together. I have been caring for Hailey since she was six weeks old. She is almost 4 now, and the time has flown by.

I try to keep our daily routine as much like the old one as possible, but the differences are striking. In the era of COVID-19, I am Hailey’s only playmate. Instead of running around with her, I try my best to keep my distance while she plays. While Hailey naps, I sanitize every surface I can. I am as thorough as possible, fearing the worst if I miss a spot. I wonder when I will be able to find sanitizer at the store again. My cleaning supplies are running low, and the store shelves are empty. I have no idea how I will be able to maintain a clean, healthy, virus-free environment without access to bleach.

By the end of the day, I am mentally and emotionally exhausted, but I do not dare rest until I take a shower and change. As I do so, I continue to think of Hailey. She still seems happy and content to run around the otherwise empty child care. I wonder if she understands any of what is happening. Does she miss her friends? Can she tell that I am afraid?

My story has played out in many emergency child care homes and centers throughout our state. Money is not our motivation. Caregivers opened their homes and centers so that families can continue their essential work, without the pressure of worrying about what to do with their children. 

What will the post-pandemic world look like for centers and home programs once this lockdown has ended? Rumors are running rampant that we will lose a large portion of our children. How will our programs survive? It is more important than ever for both center and home-based providers to stand together in solidarity.   

I feel solidarity with my fellow child care workers right now, because I know that many are facing the same challenges that I am. Day after day, child care workers are overlooked on the news and left out of COVID-19 relief packages. We do not have access to personal protective equipment or sanitization supplies. Child care workers have been given, on average, an extra $10 per day to take care of children during the pandemic. Yet, we put our lives and our families’ lives at risk every day. If child care workers were unable to work, other essential workers would be forced to stop working too.

Like other essential workers, child care workers are in the fight of, and for, our lives. We know that now is the time for us to step forward and do what we do best: take care of children. We need our policymakers to recognize our sacrifice by giving us the recognition, funding and protective equipment we need to do our work

 

 

Courtesy of Exchange Magazine July/August 2020  exchangepress.com

Exchange Magazine provides a variety of articles including stories about and by family child care providers

 

These colorful mini-posters can be posted near the sink as reminders for when to wash your hands and hand washing procedures.

Remember to Wash Your Hands Poster

How To Wash Hands Poster

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It is not uncommon for toddlers to bite, but it can be difficult to stay calm and know how to respond. This fact sheet give information about why toddlers bite and how to respond appropriately when biting occurs.

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Biting – A Fact Sheet

Taking care of young children is a job filled with joy, but also responsibility, and it can be stressful.  This booklet from Head Start ECLCK gives information on how to identify your sources of stress and strategies for reducing stress.  Learn more about how to identify your stressors and manage them effectively.

Taking Care of Ourselves Booklet – English

 

Para ver este recurso en español haga clic aquí

Snacks are part of the daily routine with young children and important for getting the nutrients they need as well as maintaining energy throughout the day. This tip sheet from the USDA offers great ideas for providers and parents for healthy snacking for children.

My Plate Snack Tip Sheet

 

This handout gives procedures for maintaining proper hygiene while diapering and hand-washing. This may be useful when new assistants are hired or for any adult who is helping out.

Diapering and Handwashing Handout

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This series of 12 posters created by Head Start ECLKC offer concise information about stress and different strategies for managing it, including self care.  You can print these out and post them in different areas of your home. These posters are designed to be printed out in color on 8″ x 14″ paper.

Stress Posters – English

Stress Posters – Spanish