We are protectors!

I often remind the children of the great privilege and responsibilities we have when we spend time in nature.

I am a true believer that a child exposed to the natural world will have heightened respect and deep regard for that world. 

Teaching your child to be kind to even the smallest creature is a value they can carry with them throughout their whole lives.

Exposing your child to bugs early on is less about education and more about empathy and understanding; It’s about teaching love and kindness, acceptance and tolerance.

The kids loved getting eye level with all the new little creatures and explore their worlds. 

Today we did many kinds of bug boards to flip over and discover what their habitat looks like.

We did bug logs, rocks, stumps, boards, pavers.

While teaching the kids about bugs, I want them to understand insects can be useful and are needed in the environment. We talked about how to be respectful to the bugs. It’s normal to see interesting bugs outside because that is their home, but we have to be gentle and respect their space. Sometimes we can put them in an indoor habitat and observe them, and sometimes we observe them in their outdoor habitat.

How I guide their interest:

How I expand their learning:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the book The Last Child in the Woods, Richard Louv (2005) links the lack of nature in the lives of children to being part of a “wired generation.” He says attention disorders, depression (yes, in children), and obesity are all due to a “Nature Deficit.” This is an amazing book and a great resource for teachers. I encourage you to read it and bring more nature into your work with children

Kids love to dig and what’s more exciting than finding a Roly Poly? Supply the kids with shovels, magnifying glasses and bug containers and let them go to work. I purchased all of my supplies at the Dollar Store making it very reasonably priced. You could use recycled food containers and spoons found in your kitchen if you don’t have access to these materials.

Here are some fun facts about roly polies that you may not know:

You can explore habitats of all kinds of animals, bugs, or crustaceans. Try creating a roly poly habitat with children out of found materials. However, you also want to help children respect animals and their natural habitats. So make sure they know you ALWAYS put animals back in their natural habitats at the end of every day.